A Work in Progress

Medina Rock & Rail, Martin Marietta's newest rail-serviced operation, is nearing completion

It’s more than a decade in the making and the largest capital investment project in the Company’s history.

On Jan. 1, Medina Rock & Rail, a massive new rail-serviced facility about 50 miles west of San Antonio, Texas, is slated to open for business.

Bill Steiner, director of field engineering, and Jon McGee, engineering project manager, say construction at the 4,000-acre site will be completed by the fall. Medina’s management and crew will then work to meet a series of production deadlines leading up to January, when the quarry is expected to be fully operational.

“This job, as a whole, is unique,” McGee says. “It’s not typical to build a plant of this size right from day one.”

The site will feature 59 conveyors, 17 screens and five crushers – including a mobile crusher similar to the one currently operating at Beckmann Quarry.

Medina's secondary plant rises high into the skies of Hondo, Texas.Medina's secondary plant rises high into the skies of Hondo, Texas.

The site’s most impressive feature, however, will be the state-of-the-art automated rail loading system designed by West Virginia-based Kanawha Scales & Systems.

McGee says Martin Marietta first worked with the company at Georgia’s Augusta Quarry.

“That system is great, but we did find some things to improve upon and we’ve been working with Kanawha up front to really cater this new system to our needs at Medina,” he says. “Since this is strictly a rail-serviced quarry, we wanted to get the best, most efficient, high-rate rail loading system that we could.”

Teams of contract workers are nearing the completion of the construction phase of the Medina project. Teams of contract workers are nearing the completion of the construction phase of the Medina project.

Chance Allen, the vice president-general manager for the Southwest Division’s Central Texas Aggregates District, says the Medina project aims to preserve Martin Marietta’s position in the dynamic Texas market at a time when New Braunfels Quarry is nearing the end of its life cycle and reserves at Beckmann are in need of protection for local demands.

“These two rail-connected quarries have been among the district’s most profitable, but the challenge we’re now confronted with is that their production is not sustainable,” Allen says. “The Medina project will be capable of servicing this proven market over the next half-century.”

Jason Jones, plant manager at Medina, says the site will employ approximately 50 people once it is up and running.

Medina Rock & Rail Information Box

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